Pre-Conference Program - Tuesday 10 September 2019

Workshops & Tours

The aim of the pre-conference Workshop and Tours program is to increase the capacity of delegates to implement and advocate for effective, evidence-based palliative care models of care and policies into their respective communities and countries.

These workshops & interactive study tours will take place on Tuesday 10 September 2019 (except for ISPEC) and have a limited participant capacity and are optional extras (not included in the conference registration).

Register for these workshops & tours when you for the Conference. Non-conference attendees can register via this link.

Registration fees*

For Conference Attendees
$100.00 inc. GST per workshop or tour

Non-Conference Attendees
$350.00 for members or $450.00 inc GST for non-members per workshop or tour

*As the ISPEC workshop runs for 2.5 days, registration is $300.00 inc GST.

Thank you to workshop hosts!

Palliative Care Australia (PCA) greatly appreciates the support of our Affiliate Members organisations, Project Partners, Stakeholder organisations and Sponsored Partners for hosting these workshops at 19OPCC. These workshops were accepted into the program as part of broader partnership and/or sponsorship arrangements with Palliative Care Australia. In 2021, there will also be a public Call for workshop submission process that will seek proposals for pre-conference workshops. 

Full Day Workshops

Dealing with complexity in children’s palliative care (PAPCANZ)
9am – 4.30pm

Multi Day Workshop

Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC)
Sunday 8 – Tuesday 10 September

Half-Day Workshops - AM

Trainees Workshop: For Palliative Medicine Advanced Trainees Hosted by Australian New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM)
9am – 12.30pm

Public Health approach to Palliative Care (PHPC)
9am – 4.30pm

Holistic healing responses for our Stolen Generations
9am – 12.30pm

Improving palliative care and advance care planning for older Australians Hosted by End of Life Direction for Aged Care (ELDAC)
9am – 12.30pm

Managing chronic breathlessness in the palliative care setting: A practical workshop (PCNA & UTS)
9am – 12.30pm

Half-Day Workshops - PM

International collaboration (IAHPC)
1pm – 4.30pm

Managing Challenging Wounds at End of Life: A practical workshop (PCNA & Silverchain)
1pm – 4.30pm

Recent developments in adult bereavement: Bridging theory and practice
1pm – 4.30pm

Psychological Resilience of Palliative Care Clinicians
1pm – 4.30pm

End of Life Law for Clinicians (ELLC)
1pm – 4.30pm

Tours - Half Day

Aboriginal approaches to death and dying
1pm – 4.30pm  ~WAITLIST ONLY~

Contemporary approaches to death, dying and burial
1pm – 4.30pm  ~WAITLIST ONLY~

Tour details

SOLD OUT, waiting list only

Experience firsthand what others are doing with innovative models of care, creative service delivery, clinical research and even alternative end-of-life practices available in Western Australia.

These tours will depart from the Perth Convention & Exhibition Centre (PCEC) at 1pm sharp and return by 4.45pm, in time for the Welcome Experience (cocktail reception) from 5pm – 7.30pm. A lunchbox will be provided on departure for each tour.

We would like to thank Palliative Care WA for organising these tours. Palliative Care WA is the state’s peak body for palliative care. They do not deliver palliative care services, however their role is to raise awareness of palliative care and improve access for all Western Australians. 

Click each tour for more information:

Tour 1 - Aboriginal approaches to death and dying

This tour will explore unique Aboriginal approaches to death and dying. The tour will include visits to sacred sites with local explanations of their meaning, an exploration of Kings Park (including a wildflower walk) and a visit to the Elizabeth Quay bird statue in Perth’s central business district.

Tour 2 - Contemporary approaches to death, dying and burial

There is increasing interest in alternative approaches to end-of-life. This tour starts with a visit to one of Perth’s oldest and largest cemeteries, Karrakatta as well as a visit to Pinnaroo Valley Memorial Park, considered to be the most environmentally responsible cemetery in Australia. Open since 1978 this Park has been developed and maintained as a natural bushland cemetery without monuments. This tour will also provide an opportunity to visit an independent mortuary and meet with a funeral director for an interactive Q&A session with highly skilled and experienced practitioners exploring other contemporary and environmentally-friendly practices, changing the way we approach after-death care in WA.

Public Health approach to Palliative Care (PHPC)

Hosted by La Trobe University Palliative Care Unit and Palliative Care Australia

Half-Day  
9am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Dr Bruce Rumbold OAM
Director, Palliative Care Unit, School of Psychology & Public Health, College of Science, Health & Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

Andrea Grindrod
Projects Manager, Palliative Care Unit, School of Psychology & Public Health, La Trobe University

Kelly Gourlay
National Policy Manager, Palliative Care Australia

Prof Samar Aoun
Professor of Palliative Care, La Trobe University

Public health is interested in the settings – physical, social and cultural – in which people live, and the way these settings shape their development, their relationships, their choices, their health and in due course their deaths. It’s not only healthy living, but also healthy dying, that is created in healthy settings.

Viewing palliative care through a public health lens invites us to ask why some people in our society receive excellent end of life care while others do not; why palliative care works well in some communities and not so well in others; why we always seem to end up focusing exclusively on health services when we discuss people’s end of life needs; why we struggle to create supportive collaborations between the social networks that shape people’s everyday lives and the expert services they may need to support aspects of their dying: to examine how the responsibility for care is being shared between families, friends, neighbours and various healthcare professionals.

This workshop will explore how best to engage the many circles of care around each dying person. We’ll use the knowledge and experience of participants to set up dialogues across some of the boundaries that can interrupt care, and develop strategies where palliative care services make a public health contribution to the end of life care being provided. 

We expect, alongside other issues that may be raised in the workshop, to:

  • Introduce a framework for public health thinking about end of life care: Healthy End of Life Project (HELP) framework
  • Outline tools for mapping the assets individuals and communities have for end of life care
  • Discuss possibilities and barriers to developing community capacity in end of life care
  • Review strategies for supporting and enhancing the networks in which a dying person is already engaged
  • Discuss strategies for negotiating the interface between formal and informal caregiving
  • Suggest tools for clinicians and professional services to initiate community engagement
  • Discuss ways of developing evidence and using this to inform end of life policy and practice locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

Workshop participants will be invited to link with a national community of practice in public health palliative care if they wish to continue exploring ideas engaged in this workshop.

Palliative Care Nurses Australia (PCNA)

Hosted by Palliative Care Nurses Australia (PCNA)

Full-Day  
9.00am – 12.30pm / 1.00pm-4.30pm 
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Workshop 1 (9.00am – 12.30pm)
Managing chronic breathlessness in the palliative care setting: A practical workshop

Palliative Care Nurses Australia and the University of Technology Sydney

Facilitator: Jane Phillips, RN, PhD, FACN, President PCNA, UTS Professor Palliative Nursing and Director IMPACCT, University of Technology Sydney, NSW
Dr Diana Ferreira, Flinders University

The management of chronic breathlessness is presents many challenges for patients, their carers and clinicians. This interactive workshop will review the current pharmacological and non-pharmacological evidence and use case studies to demonstrate how this evidence can be applied in clinical practice.

Workshop 2 (1.00pm-4.30pm)
Managing Challenging Wounds at End of Life: A practical workshop

Palliative Care Nurses Australia and Silver Chain

Facilitator: Jane Phillips, RN, PhD, FACN, President PCNA, UTS Professor Palliative Nursing and Director IMPACCT, University of Technology Sydney, NSW
Presenter: Keryln Carville RN, PhD, STN (Cred), Professor Primary Health Care and Community Nursing, Silver Chain & Curtin University Perth, WA

The management of complex wounds constitutes considerable challenges, especially in the palliative care setting. Not least of all are the challenges related to promoting quality of life for patients and their carers.  Challenges for clinicians and clients, are usually associated with the need to confront problems associated with loss of body image, excessive exudate and odour containment, infection prevention or management, a need for haemostasis and the need to optimise patient wellbeing.  The ongoing challenge however, is to employ strategies that do this in the most cost-effective manner. This workshop will outline a practical problem-solving approach to the management of challenging wounds.   Case studies will be used to highlight problems and the workshop will focus on evidence based practice and ‘tips and tricks’ for management, including in low resource settings.

Trainees Workshop: For Palliative Medicine Advanced Trainees Hosted by Australian New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine 

Hosted by Australia New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM)

Half-Day  
9am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Dr Lisa MillerConsultant Psychiatirst at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital

Dr Frank Brennan, Palliative Care Lawyer and Palliative Care Physician, Calvary, St George and Sutherland Hospitals

Dr Sarah WenhamConsultant Palliative Medicine Physician, Far Western LHD, NSW

ANZSPM is holding a half day workshop for palliative medicine trainees and new fellows from Australia and New Zealand.

The workshop is open to medical practitioners training in palliative care (or recently completed training), including advance trainee/diploma of palliative care, general practitioners with a special interest in palliative care and palliative care medical officers. Unfortunately, this workshop is not open for nurse practitioners.

It will cover a range of topics relevant to the RACP Palliative Medicine curriculum with presentations by expert speakers. 

The session will cover (subject to change):

  • Rural/Remote Palliative Care – the rewards & the challenges 
  • Home to Country – Repatriation of Indigenous Australians at the end of life
  • Demoralisation Syndrome 
  • Management of End Stage Liver Disease

Dealing with complexity in children’s palliative care

Hosted by Paediatric Palliative Care Australia and New Zealand (PAPCANZ)

Full-Day  
9am – 4.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019
Limited to 40 people

Greg Adams (USA)
Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) and coordinates the Center for Good Mourning

Dr Ross Drake (NZ)
Paediatric Pain Medicine and Palliative Care Specialist, Starship Child Health New Zealand

A/Prof Helen Irving
Pre-Eminent Specialist, Children’s Health Queensland; Clinical Lead of the Centre for Children’s Health Ethics and Law (CCHEL) Children’s Health Queensland Hospital 

Dr Lisa Cuddeford
Clinical Lead, WA Paediatic Palliative Care Service, Perth Children’s Hospital

The day will be led by Greg Adams. Greg is travelling from Little Rock, Arkansas, USA where he coordinates the Center for Good Mourning, a grief support and outreach program and works with bereavement support for staff who are exposed to suffering and loss.

This interactive workshop will be aimed to engage delegates through panel discussions and group work facilitated by respected international and national colleagues.

  • We will consider a range of issues in complex decision making including the place of parental autonomy in care and ethical dilemmas.
  • We will be challenged to consider and share the management of refractory symptoms for our complex patient group and.
  • We will address the management of grief in complex situations within families, carers and professionals

Attend ready to share with and learn from esteemed colleagues and debate thorny issues!

International Collaboration to Advance Global Palliative Care (IAHPC)

Hosted by International Association of Hospice & Palliative Care (IAHPC)

Half-Day  
1pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

 

 

 

Dr Ebtesam Ahmed (Egypt)
Board, International Association of Hospice & Palliative Care (IAHPC); Clinical Professor for the Department of Clinical Health Professions at St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Dr Odette Spruytt (Australia)
Founder, Australasian Palliative Link International (APLI); Palliative Care Consultant, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Dr. Tania Pastrana (Colombia)
President, Latin American Association for Palliative Care; Research Adviser, International Association of Hospice & Palliative Care (IAHPC)
Liliana De Lima (USA)
Executive Director, International Association of Hospice & Palliative Care (IAHPC)

Approximately 25.5 million out of 56.2 million people who died in 2015 experienced serious health-related suffering (SHS) which could have been ameliorated by palliative care and pain relief. In addition, another 35.5 million people experienced SHS due to life-threatening and life-limiting conditions, or at the end of life. A disproportionate number – over 80% – of these 61 million individuals live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with severely limited access to palliative care, especially oral immediate-release morphine for pain relief. Even within specific populations groups, the evidence is staggering: Nearly 2.5 million children worldwide die in need of palliative care and pain relief when over 90% of pediatric deaths associated with SHS are avoidable.[1]

In the globalized society we live in, international collaboration gain in importance. Collaborations might, over time, impact by changes affecting individual, institution, and countries and provide an opportunity to learn of each other.

This workshop will focus on the opportunities for collaboration between agencies, organizations, academia and individuals to help reduce this access gap and advance global palliative care as components of the right to health. Through sharing of experience and knowledge, participants will analyze the challenges that patients and families face in LMICs and learn successful strategies implemented by IAHPC and partnering organizations for reducing SHS, including access to essential medicines for pain relief and palliative care, education, appropriate policies and service delivery.  Participants will also learn how they fit into the global advocacy strategy for palliative care, map potential partners and will develop an action plans they may take to help advance global palliative care.

Method:

Inputs and small working groups. A final presentation with discussion and reflection.

[1] Knaul FM, Farmer PE, Krakauer El, De Lima L, et al on behalf of the Lancet Commission on Palliative Care and Pain Relief Study Group. Alleviating the access abyss in palliative care and pain relief—an imperative of universal health coverage: The Lancet Commission report. The Lancet, 2017. Accessible at: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32513-8/fulltext 

Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC):
Train-the-trainer

Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC) & Cancer Council WA

2 ½ Day Workshop
Sunday 8 – Tuesday 10 September 2019
Swan Room, Parmelia Hilton, 14 Mill Street Perth 6000

Registration fee: $300.00 (inc gst)


Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea will be provided. Sunday & Monday are full days (8am-5pm) and Tuesday is a half day in the morning (8am-12pm, lunch 12pm-1pm). 

Dr Christina Puchalski, MD, MS, FACP, FAAHPM, Co-Director of Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC), Founder and Director of the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health (GWish) and Professor of Medicine at The George Washington University, Washington DC. Dr Puchalski is an international leader for the integration of spirituality into healthcare in clinical settings and medical education. Christina will be joined by experts in the field of spirituality to deliver this train-the-trainer event

Empirical evidence, patient and family experience, and theoretical frameworks support the critical role spirituality and spiritual care plays in the care of patients, particularly those with chronic/ complex illness and palliative care.

Recent clinical guidelines recognise the ethical obligation of all ‎healthcare providers to alleviate pain and suffering, whether physical, psychosocial or spiritual.

Health care providers acknowledge the growing momentum calling for patients’ spirituality to be addressed, but they ‎often note lack of training as an important barrier to implementing these beliefs.

To bridge this gap, The George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health (GWish), in partnership with City of Hope, and the Fetzer Institute developed an interprofessional spiritual care training program entitled “Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC)”.

ISPEC, delivered on a global level and in collaboration with Cancer Council WA is coming to Perth, Australia for the first time. These inaugural workshops will be delivered over 2½ days and offer a theoretically and research-grounded curriculum for teaching interprofessional spiritual care.

Curricular development forms the ‎basis of a train-the-trainer program to build leaders, consultants, advocates, and ‎knowledgeable ‎clinicians who can educate, empower, and guide other healthcare professionals at their institute ‎in the ‎integration of spirituality in healthcare.‎

The ISPEC curriculum encourages interprofessional pairs of clinicians (Doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and other professions including chaplains) although, individuals will be considered.

  • Build your knowledge and practice of spirituality in healthcare environments utilising an evidence based, research grounded curriculum
  • Learn from a highly experienced team of experts including international pioneer in spirituality, Dr Christina Puchalski
  • Understand health providers ethical obligations to alleviate pain and suffering whether physical, psychosocial or spiritual
  • Unique opportunity to attend a train-the-trainer pre conference 2 ½ day workshop

 

Parking

 

Option 1 – Parmelia Hilton Valet Parking Flat fee $55, up to 24hrs NOTE – Weekdays – ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF BAYS AVAILABLE (height restriction of 1.9 metres)

 Option 2 – Perth Convention Exhibition Centre – Across the road from the hotel Hourly rate – $6.00 Monday to Friday 6am – 5.59pm – $23 Saturday, Sunday, Public Holiday rates 6am – 5.59pm – $16.80 Night Rate, 6pm – 5.59am – $16.80

 Option 3 – Wilson Parking – Westralia Square Pre-book online for discounted rates: https://www.wilsonparking.com.au/park/6059_Westralia-Square_Westralia-Square-141-St-Georges-Tce

Holistic healing responses for our Stolen Generations

Hosted by The Healing Foundation

Half-Day  
9am ‐ 12.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Ian Hamm
Chair, The Healing Foundation Stolen Generations Reference Group Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander aged care sector representative/s

Since the establishment of The Healing Foundation, collaborative and collective healing responses have been provided to members of the Stolen Generations and their descendants, establishing a pathway to understanding their unique healing journeys and what it takes to support this process. Considerable research has been undertaken to understand and address the historic trauma that is ever present in the lives of our Stolen Generations and their descendants. As part of this continued pursuit to understand where and how trauma is being experienced in our communities and to provide pathways for healing, The Healing Foundation commissioned the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) to conduct a demographic and needs analysis of Stolen Generations members and their descendants. The AIHW report uncovered the chronic health, disability and alarming levels of economic and social disadvantage experienced by the Stolen Generations and their descendants. As the first demographic study of its kind, it also provided comprehensive data to illustrate the direct link between the forced removal of tens of thousands of children from their families and the real-life symptoms of Intergenerational Trauma within today’s families and communities.

Before this report, we did not know how many Stolen Generations members were still alive, let alone where and how they live, making it difficult to determine their needs and plan and develop appropriate service responses.

The AIHW report, supported by our other research, highlights current failures in delivering accessible and effective solutions. The Stolen Generations and their descendants are 1.5 times more likely to report access difficulties than other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This is largely because of a lack of appropriate healing services across areas where we now know that the Stolen Generations and their families live. Poor accessibility is also linked to issues with trust and a failure to provide services that are trauma-informed and culturally focused.

As an aging population, our Stolen Generations members require a unique response and care provisions within the aged care sector. This workshop, co-facilitated by the Chair of The Healing Foundation’s Stolen Generations Reference Group and representative/s from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander aged care sector, is designed to explore the deep and intrinsic needs of our Stolen Generations and how to meet these needs in the context of palliative care.

It is hoped that by attending this workshop participants will be have the opportunity to learn, share and identify solutions to meet the sensitive needs of our Stolen Generations members and their families.

Improving palliative care and advance care planning for older Australians

Hosted by End of Life Directions in Aged Care (ELDAC)

Half-Day  
9am – 12.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Presenters: Patsy Yates, Jennifer Tieman, Deborah Parker, Lindy Willmot, Ben White, Kate Silk and Rebecca Moore.

End of Life Directions in Aged Care (ELDAC) is a nationally funded project to improve palliative care and advance care planning for older Australians. Specifically, the aims of the program are to:

  1. Provide specialist palliative care and advance care planning advice to aged care providers and GPs providing health care for recipients of aged care services;
  2. Improve linkages between aged care services and palliative care services;
  3. Improve the palliative care skills and advance care planning expertise of aged care service staff and GPs providing health care for recipients of aged care services; and,
  4. Improve the quality of care for aged care recipients, prevent unnecessary hospital admissions, and shorten hospital stays.

A variety of information resources are available to build capacity including a set of action oriented toolkits. Various activities enable linkages to be developed including a working together toolkit to guide interactions, and a formal engagement project that provides facilitation and support at the service level. Policy work and digital innovations are further streams which seek to embed palliative care and advance care planning practices within the sector.

Aim of the workshop

This workshop will provide an overview of the ELDAC Care model and key resources which can build knowledge and guide palliative care and advance care planning delivery. Those attending will be introduced to the five ELDAC toolkits and how to use them in practice.  Workshop attendees will have the opportunity to engage with the developers of the ELDAC resources. The session will include demonstrations, interactive activities and opportunities for networking between workshop participants and with the ELDAC project team. Participants will also be provided with a kit of ELDAC resources.

Expected learning outcomes for workshop participants.

  1. Increased knowledge of the role of palliative care and advance care planning within the aged care sector
  2. Familiarity with ELDAC Care model and key information and advisory services by the project
  3. Ability to select and apply resources and information found within the five ELDAC toolkits
  4. Understanding of the importance of linkages between services and strategies to implement and maintain linkages

Recent developments in adult bereavement: Bridging theory and practice

Hosted by Australia Centre for Grief & Bereavement (ACGB)

Half-Day  
1pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019

Mr Christopher Hall
Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement

Providing bereavement support is an essential component of palliative care service delivery. While loss and grief are fundamental to human life, the course and consequences of bereavement will vary for each individual. How can a practitioner apply contemporary research evidence in order to provide best quality bereavement care?

It has been calculated that it takes an average of 17 years for research evidence to reach clinical practice. Over the past few decades the field of grief and bereavement has undergone transformational change in terms of how the human experience of loss is understood and how the goals and outcomes of grief therapy are conceptualised. We now know a great deal about what is effective in the provision of bereavement care. There has been a lot of discussion on evidence informed practice and practice informed evidence. 

This workshop will provide a broad overview of recent developments and trends in the field of adult bereavement. Issues such as complicated or prolonged grief, matching clients’ needs and preferences to interventions and how do we go about measuring the impact of our work with clients will be considered.

Psychological Resilience of Palliative Care Clinicians

Hosted by Macquarie University and Resilience Research & Training Systems.

Half-Day  
1pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019
Limited to 150 people

Dr Monique Crane
Founder, Resilience Research and Training Systems and Senior Lecturer, Organisational Psychology, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Fellow, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University

Dr Nicole Weeks
Research Psychologist, Macquarie University

Supporting the resilience of employees through resilience training has several positive impacts including reduced sick days, lower burnout, increased productivity, enhanced morale, and the ability to bounce back from setbacks and work demands.

Resilience is a complex area and developing and maintaining personal resilience in the face of workplace demands can be very challenging. Working in clinical palliative care can be an extremely demanding environment. Aside from the emergence of emotional demands attributable to working with individuals navigating end of life and their families, there are also broader constraints whereby clinical staff are   required to provide quality care with less resources (e.g., staff). In our previous work within palliative care, the most frequently reported concern among clinicians was related to the feeling that the current work demands were a barrier to caring for those patients in a way consistent with professional values. These demands on clinicians can take a toll on their mental health and job engagement. Although there are often many organisational factors that contribute to these demands, there are still practices individuals can do to support their own resilience in the face of these workplace stressors.

Over thirty years of research has helped us to understand how to support the resilience of employees across a diverse range of sectors. The resilience training delivered by Resilience Research and Training Systems from Macquarie University involves the application of this research in the workplace to help clinicians understand resilience and invest in their psychological wellbeing.

In this half-day workshop, clinicians will be taught about the science of resilience and how resilience is developed over time. We will also discuss some of the core resilience capacities that typically facilitate resilience. Topics that will be explored include:

  • How is resilience developed over time
  • What is burnout: Signs, symptoms, and prevention
  • What are the major contributors to resilience that can be changed
  • Developing your personal resilience

This resilience workshop is fund by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project Grant and sponsored by the University of Queensland and Macquarie University.

Resilience Research and Training Systems is located at Macquarie University. It includes a team of researchers dedicated to the provision of evidence-based psychological resilience services to diverse organisations. Our team conducts innovative research about how organisations can promote the psychological resilience of their employees. We have worked with both public and private organisations to ensure that all employees may benefit from mentally health and resilient workplaces. For more information about our services and research visit www.occupationalresilience.com.au

End of Life Law for Clinicians (ELLC)

Hosted by Australian Centre for Health Law Research & Queensland University of Technology (QUT)

Half-Day  
1pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday 10 September 2019
Limited to 40 people

Prof Ben White
Professor of Law, Australian Centre for Health Law Research, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology

Prof Lindy Willmott
Professor of Law, Australian Centre for Health Law Research, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology

End of life law can be complex. The law is different in each Australian State and Territory, and differs depending on whether or not a person has capacity.  Research has revealed significant knowledge gaps about end of life law amongst Australian clinicians but also that they would like to know more about it. Not knowing the law can compromise quality of care and patient outcomes: for example, inadequate pain relief being provided to a person close to death; treatment being withheld or withdrawn without lawful consent; and clinical practice that is inconsistent with a persons’ values or preferences. It can also make it difficult for clinicians to navigate the challenging legal issues that can arise in clinical practice.

The End of Life Law for Clinicians training program aims to improve clinicians’ knowledge of the law in clinical practice, and prepare them to manage future risk through case-study based workshops and online training about key aspects of end of life law.

In this workshop, clinicians will explore how the law applies to three case studies based on real clinical scenarios. Legal topics that will be explored include:

  • Capacity and consent to treatment
  • Advance Care Directives
  • Withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining medical treatment
  • Substitute decision-making
  • Palliative medication.

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